How Many Km Around The World

How many km is the other side of the world?

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How many km is space from Earth?

Yet the edge of space – or the point where we consider spacecraft and astronauts to have entered space, known as the Von Karman Line – is only 62 miles (100 kilometers) above sea level.

How many km is the Moon?

The average distance between the Earth and the Moon is 384 400 km (238 855 miles). The Moon’s elliptical orbit with the distances at apogee and perigee.

How many miles around the Earth in a straight line?

The distance around the Earth at the Equator, its circumference, is 40,075 kilometers (24,901 miles).

How long would it take to drive around the Earth?

In other words, if you could drive your car around the equator of the Earth (yes, even over the oceans), you’d put on an extra 40,075 km on the odometer. It would take you almost 17 days driving at 100 km/hour, 24 hours a day to complete that journey. If you like, you can calculate the Earth’s circumference yourself.

Who owns the Moon?

The short answer is that no one owns the Moon. That’s because of a piece of international law. The Outer Space Treaty of 1967, put forward by the United Nations, says that space belongs to no one country.

Can a plane reach space?

Planes can and have flown into space for over 50 years – though not the kind you see at the airport. That’s because conventional planes need air for both propulsion and lift, and space is essentially a vacuum.

What does space smell like?

In a video shared by Eau de Space, NASA astronaut Tony Antonelli says space smells “strong and unique,” unlike anything he has ever smelled on Earth. According to Eau de Space, others have described the smell as “seared steak, raspberries, and rum,” smokey and bitter.

Who named the Earth?

The answer is, we don’t know. The name “Earth” is derived from both English and German words, ‘eor(th)e/ertha’ and ‘erde’, respectively, which mean ground. But, the handle’s creator is unknown. One interesting fact about its name: Earth is the only planet that wasn’t named after a Greek or Roman god or goddess.

Who discovered Earth?

The first person to determine the size of Earth was Eratosthenes of Cyrene, who produced a surprisingly good measurement using a simple scheme that combined geometrical calculations with physical observations.